Friday, February 26, 2010

Food Gallery


I don't know why, but I was mesmerized by the brilliant orange color of these tiny kumquats at the farmers market. But really when you think about it, that orange wouldn't look as spectacular if it was blown up to the size of, say, an orange. Then it looks normal.

So it must be something about these miniature citrus that makes them look so photogenic, which is why I made this series of shots. Kumquats are originally from China, and the name is actually the Chinese pronunciation of the fruit and literally means "golden seed." Looks like a prosperous new year in the Single Guy household this year of the tiger. ;-)



8 comments:

merry said...

what name this

foodhoe said...

ahhh such beautiful portraits. I like the artsy zen edges too. Are they edible? They look like too much work to eat to me!

Hungry Dog said...

Kumquats are so pretty and I do love that they are tiny. What do you do with them? Besides take lovely photos, that is? ;)

Carolyn Jung said...

Beautifully done! So what will you do with those lovely little kumquats now? ;)

Single Guy Ben said...

Foodhoe, they are edible. At the farmer stand, there was a sign recommending that you rub the kumquat between your fingers a bit to release some of the oil and then bite in, saying the skin is totally edible. I tried that and have to say even though the skin is edible, it's not the most enjoyable experience. If the skin was thinner, maybe, but it's as thick as a tangerine for example.

So what did I do? I used it mostly as a garnish, because it's so pretty. In a couple of days I'll post a photo of the dish I made using it as a garnish.

Anonymous said...

My mom soaks them in salt? Don't remember. When you have a sore throat, she'll bring it out and drink some to feel better. I still have it, but don't really want to drink it.

Victor said...

Wow, those are some awesome shots? Did you try eating a few? Were they sweet? And could you actually eat the skin (it looks a bit thick)?

Lu said...

About soaking kumquats in salt reminded me of this weeks Chicago Reader and Paul Virant's recipe for preserved lemon butter, it starts out something like this:
Cut the lemon into six wedges, bury in the salt/sugar mixture, and let sit for four to six months. Remove the pulp, rinse to remove salt, and blend with the butter and other ingredients ...

You may also be interested in the ongoing feature in which a chef tackles an odd ingredient for the week and then passes on a challenge of another odd ingredient to the next in line chef.

See www.chicagoreader.com